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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 94 (some duplicates have been removed)
the national institutes of health where you are hindering growth you are not delegate t going te deficit. we need more revenue and more cuts. i would like to see that in a big balanced bold proposal. short of that, we must do something to avoid the sequester. >> chris: here is what house speaker boehner said this week. >> at some point, washington, has to deal with its spending problem. i have watched them kick this can down the road for 22 years that i have been here. i have had enough of it. it's time to act. >> chris: congress woman, let's look at the numbers. are you really saying in a government that spends $3.5 trillion a year increased discretionary spending by 14% in the last four years you can't $85 billion to cut to avoid the sequester. >> we have made the cut in terms of agriculture subsidies. there are tens of billions of dollars in cuts there. and that should be balanced with eliminating subsidies for big oil. why should we lower pell grants instead of eliminating the subsidies for big oil? >> chris: why not just cut spending. 85 billion north dakota a $3.5 trillion government.
are no going to reduce the deficit. so, what we do need is more revenue, and more cuts, but i would like to see that a big, balanced, bold proposal. and short of that, we must do something to avoid the sequester. >> chris: here's what house speaker boehner said this week: >> at some point washington has to deal with its spending problem. i watched them kick the can down though road for 22 years i have been here and i have had enough of it. >> chris: congresswoman, let's look at this numbers. are you really saying in you a government that spends $3.5 trillion a year, that increased federal discretionary spending by 14%, over the last four years, you can't find 8 8 -- $85 billion to cut, to avoid sequester. >> we have cut agriculture subsidy, tense of billions of dollars in cuts there and that should be balanced with eliminating subsidy for big oil. why should we do -- why should we lower pel grants instead of eliminating the subsidies for big oil. >> chris: why not just cut spending, $85 billion in a $3.5 trillion government. >> let's back up from -- with all due respect to the speaker, what he
" is next. host: the federal deficit is expected to dip below one trillion. the news comes as republicans and democrats face a march 1 deadline to avoid billions in across-the-board spending cuts. the pentagon announced it will offer benefits to same-sex couples. in the senate is wrapping up work on the violence against women act. and the house will vote on a bill requiring the president to offer a plan to balance the federal budget in 10 years. good morning. we begin with your take on the leaked white paper from the white house just fine drone strikes on u.s. citizens overseas. nbc news reported on the memo monday night and it has gotten lots of reaction in washington. what are your thoughts? call -- we want to get your thoughts on social media as well on twitter or facebook. or send us an e-mail. we will get your thoughts in a moment. first, josh gerstein is joining us on the phone. here's your headline -- what was this memo? guest: this is a white paper that looks like it was derived from some confidential legal opinions that the opinions -- opinions that the justice department wrote t
's different? we have seen an enormous increase in the u.s. trade deficit, especially with countries like china. today, they happened to release a report that looked at the effect of currency manipulation, perhaps the single most important factor and explain the growth of our trade deficit. eliminating the trade deficit or eliminating currency manipulation could reduce the trade as a by roughly $190-$490 billion. doing this would increase manufacturing employment by up to 1 million jobs. that's a big downpayments in the whole we have created in manufacturing and employment. one thing we need to do is create demand. that is what we did do but we did not do that in the last decade. we need to shift the demand to domestic produced goods resulting in the hiring of domestic workers. manufacturing jobs are amongst the best for workers especially for those without a college degree. high wages, good benefits. >> bruce, you worked in washington, d.c., and brookings is right off dupont. >> i am mostly on a plane. >> industrial policy is a dirty word. if you go to any other domestic place, it will land yo
is happening, it is true that the deficits are going to be below a trillion dollars for the first time in several years. it is true that the new revenues and spending that you did not do -- it is also true the economy is beginning to grow again. this is almost like the reverse of what we did in 1993. i was perfectly well aware that a raise taxes and cut spending, it could have been dragging effect on the economy. but not nearly as much as not nearly as much as having low growth or then having interest rates that were too high. so our gamble was that the explosive effect of lowing interest rates with a booming bond market and having more disposal income over five-10 year period to invest in america's future would more than offset putting the hammer down by raising more money and cutting spending. it turned out to be a good gamble. it will make sense here again. but timing is everything. so i think you should have a budget that does not defy arithmetic and does not follow in the trap that we had for 20 of the last 32 years which is you always get more money when you cut taxes. but it is
that we need higher fuel tax, and we can use that either to reduce the deficit or to pay for something else. it was designed -- or intended -- whether it has done so successfully or not, it was done to pay for infrastructure. >> absolutely. we are not real happy about that. >> john, what are you hoping for next week? >> for some reason, i have not been consulted on that. the president in the campaign said he was 4 and all of the above energy policy, so let's have some announcements that support that -- he was for an " all of the above" energy policy. let's move forward with the things that you need to do to accomplish that policy. i would say that we would also -- i would like to see stop this discussion about taxing the industry and trying to characterize it as subsidies, which is simply not true, and i would like to see more opportunities in terms of where we can open up areas that are off-limits right now. all those combined can generate an enormous amount of opportunity for the economy right when we need it. >> i will just mention a couple of things. i think lenders have been reall
are talking about this issue or our deficit issue, to understand the demographic changes that are happening in and around the country. it is also the case -- i know you have been talking about manufacturing. we have a lot of jobs in this country that are unfilled. as a former superintendent of schools, i can tell you that my first priority is that we have to fill those jobs here. we are doing a horrendous job of preparing people for the stem fields that are required to make sure this country actually leads the world in advanced manufacturing. there is so much more we can do. we have not begun to do what we need to do for kids in this country to be ready for the 21st century. while we do that, it seems to me that it makes no sense for us to be saying to people that have acquired advanced degrees here and our foreign nationals, whose education we subsidized, but for a answer, because of obsolete caps that do not make sense, if that that ought to go build a business to compete with people in the united states. we need those folks here, to be able to drive innovation here. >> senator rubio is g
of americans want sensible policies for this country. they want to us deal with the deficit in a way that provides for the future of this country. so they want to invest in research and education. they want roads and bridges. we're having a tough time breaking through the division that we have in washington. and quite frankly, the more you can do to underscore the importance of the work that you do, i think the stronger the voice will be for a reasonable solution to our fiscal problems that will permit n.i.h. to get the funding it needs on a permanent basis. so i think this point needs to be underscored more and more. the work you do here and the impact it has on our lives. i was talking -- we had a chance to talk about the work being done in infection diseases about trying to develop a way in which we can get a flu shot that is more generic rather than every year. that's extremely exciting to me. i don't like trying to figure out when i'm going to get my flu shot and whether it works or not. the more we talk about what we can achieve in the future, what america can achieve in the fu
of where we stand and where we're going. the 2013 deficit standing at $845 billion. last year it was $1.1 trillion. so obviously we're going in the right direction. but they do give a grim fast if there is a type of austerity measure that is in place while the economy remains very fragile. >> well, that's right. there are two things we have to work on at the same time. the most important thing is to make sure that we continue to see an economic recovery, that we do what we can to accelerate that recovery, put more people back to work. and the sequester would undercut that effort, because if you take that much money out of the economy very rapidly in this across-the-board way, it will result in lost jobs, which is why we proposed this alternative. now over the longer term, there's no doubt we have to reduce our deficit, but we have to do it in a smart and balanced way as the president has said, and that's why we have proposed a combination of cuts and we've already done $1.5 trillion in cuts as part of the budget control act and other action. we did some revenue as part of the most recen
the deficit. all by honoring the wish of 2/3 of americans to respect states' rights for marijuana just like we do for alcohol. i would invite my colleagues to join this effort in developing a marijuana policy that makes sense for america today. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the chair recognizes the gentleman from north carolina, mr. coble, for five minutes. mr. coble: i thank the speaker. mr. speaker, january is the traditional month in which new year's resolutions are developed. i'm suggesting that president obama and mrs. boim adopt a resolution -- mrs. obama adopt a resolution. it appears to me, mr. speaker, regard air force one very casually and i believe on some occasions two planes, at least two planes go to the same destination. air force one, mr. speaker, belongs to president and mrs. obama. but air force one also belongs to the american taxpayer. and i would welcome a new year's resolution that would provide generous lace of all future air force one dispatches with prudence, discipline and last but certainly not least fiscal austerity. america's taxpayers will be
to be serious about reducing our deficit, can we combine some smart spending cuts-- because there's still some waste in government-- can we reform our health care programs in particular, because we spend lot more on health care than every other country does and we don't get better outcomes. so there's a lot of waste in the system and there are things that we can do to reduce health care costs. and can we close some loopholes and deductions that folks who are well connected and have a lot of accountants and lawyers can take advantage of so they end up paying lower rates than a bus driver or a cop, can we close some of those loopholes? if you combine those things together then we cannot only reduce our deficit but we can continue to invest in things like education and research and development that are going to help us grow. >> pelley: without raising rates again? >> without raising rates again. >> pelley: the president also made news with his opinion on the boy scouts. the national board of the boy scouts of america may decide this week whether to end its long-standing ban on gays in scouting. s
, he talked about the economy. when it comes to tackling the nation's deficit, president obama said sunday in an interview with cbs news there needs to be revenue involved. and it sounds like he might be interested in going after people like mitt romney. >> there is no doubt we need additional revenue coupled with smart spending reductions in order to bring down our deficit. and we can do it in a gradual way so that it doesn't have a huge impact. and as i said, when you look at some of these deductions that certain folks are able to take advantage of, the average person can't take advantage of them. the average person doesn't have access to cayman island accounts. the average person doesn't have access to carried interest income where they end up paying a much lower rate on billions of dollars that they've earned. so we just want to make sure that the whole system is fair. >> all right. steve, help me out here. i think the democrats are holding a losing hand if they come back and ask for more taxes. they talk about raising tax rates on anybody. but if we're talking about closing loo
like the deficit in the ryan budget was we will save unbelievable amounts of money by turning medicaid over to the states and somehow they will figure it out. >> that's more information than other people are putting out. >> talk about missing deadlines, now this is a really low bar. >> what is the democratic plan in the senate, let's say, or in the white house, to save medicar medicare? >> medicare actually - actually -- interesting you focus on that. medicare has been a pretty good story the past few years. my view is double down on things happening. medicare grew only by 3% last fiscal year, unbelievable low by standards. >> will you take that gamble >> for the next five years, i will take a 50/50 bet medicare will continue to grow at much slower rates than historically. >> down to 2 1/2, 3% the next couple years. >> that will tick up a little bit as the economy picks back up but i don't think we'll see the 10% growth rate. >> so you don't think medicare is a problem? >> it is a problem but this is one area better than official projections. >> what about medicaid. >> medicaid. big pr
there are members here that agree, you got to address the larger deficit issue and to address a large deficit issue and my own experience having participated in every budget summit that we've had in past years, you got to be able to develop a balanced package in order to do that. that's just the nature of dealing with the size deficit -- size of deficits that you got. my preference, frankly, is that the congress would do the big deal, get it done, get this behind us, detrigger sequester, some this constant uncertainty, this month-to-month situation where we don't know what the hell we're going to get. that should end. in the absence of that deal, obviously i'll support whatever package you can put together to try to detrigger sequester. whatever you can do to make sure this doesn't happen. i mean, i cannot imagine that people would stand by and deliberately hurt this country in terms of our national defense by letting this take place. >> i'll only add briefly that most of the things we're doing are reversible. that is our goal, that they would be reversible. even if you reverse them it will take so
to the deficit. on that list of attendees for that meeting include marshall fitz from the center for american progress. ben jealous from the naacp and richard from the afl-cio. later in the day the president is meeting separately with a group of business leaders. that includes lloyd from goldman sachs, from yahoo and kent from coca-cola. congress has the next three and a half months to run up the deficit as much as it wants. the house and senate extended the debt ceiling. president obama has signed the no budget, no pay act of 2013. not only does that put off the nation's debt obligations until may 18th, it also withholds pay for a number of congressmen and womenless women unless they pass a budget by april. >>> eight senators have voted to block the violence against women act. that bill would protect victims of domestic violence and this particular version extends that care to illegal immigrants, native americans and lgbt members. senators who voted against considering that bill include ted cruz, marco rubio and rand paul, all republicans. more bill's up next. stay with us. to me now? you k
. you've got to address the larger deficit issue, and to address the larger deficit issue -- and my own experience. i've participated in every budget summit we have indiana past -- we have had in past years. you have to develop a balanced package. that's the nature of dealing with the size deficits you've got. and my preference, frankly, is that the congress would do the big deal, get it done, get this behind us, detrigger sequester, stop this constant uncertainty. this month-to-month situation where we don't know what the hell we're going to get. that should end. in the absence of that deal, obviously i'll support whatever package you can put together to try to detrigger sequester. whatever you can do to make sure this doesn't happen. i mean, i cannot imagine that people would stand by and deliberately hurt this country in terms of our national defense by letting this take place. >> i'll only add briefly that most of the things we're doing are reversible. that is our goal, they would be reversible, but even if you reverse them it will take some time -- and i can't predict that yet -- w
in the debate of the deficit crisis. a spokesman for john boehner telling "the huffington post," "we can't keep chasing ever-higher washington spending with ever-higher taxes because it diminishes our children and grandchildren's future." does bringing children into the issue at all change the debate? >> well, i mean, state of the unions end up being about a vision, right? where do you want to take the country over the next year and then some. and in particular, i think for the president, it's his second term. at the end of the day, this is about where he wants to leave the country once he leaves office. emphasizing the economy, jobs, is obviously smart because that's the issue that matters most for the country, but it's also smart because that's where i think most people realize we still have work to do. we've done an enormous amount of recovery over the last four years, in particular where we'd been, but obviously, there's more work to be done. the question is, how do you do it? i think that's where i think the president's going to really kind of hone into and really emphasize the fact that w
and time again, and i think there are members here that agree, you got to address the larger deficit issue and to address a large deficit issue and my own experience having participated in every budget summit that we've had in past years, you got to be able to develop a balanced package in order to do that. that's just the nature of dealing with the size deficit -- size of deficits that you got. my preference, frankly, is that the congress would do the big deal, get it done, get this behind us, detrigger sequester, some this constant uncertainty, -- stop this constant uncertainty, this month-to-month situation where we don't know what the hell we're going to get. that should end. in the absence of that deal, obviously i'll support whatever package you can put together to try to detrigger sequester. whatever you can do to make sure this doesn't happen. i mean, i cannot imagine that people would stand by and deliberately hurt this country in terms of our national defense by letting this take place. >> i'll only add briefly that most of the things we're doing are reversible. that is our goal,
to create jobs, which is deficit spending and increased taxes to finance more domestic spending on his priorities. this is what he's been talking about, really, since he started running for reelection, which is to say the day off he got elected the first time. this is his chance, this is his thing, this is what he likes to talk about. i'm not surprised to hear him make this the focus of the state of the union, but i will say this, the consequence of him going on such an ideological, liberal sort of power point throughout his inaugural address, the position of having to go back and remind people this really is about jobs, if we don't like having 7.9% unemployment and don't like these things and the reports that we talk about global warming and marriage, et cetera, et cetera, et cetera. >> what does it actually do for him or his party. the thing is as a second term president not much he can do, pick a couple of top priorities and seems he's doing that with immigration reform and gun control and some climate change issues. so is this push for jobs because he made a push before the electio
really heart-breaking deficits in their academic skills. on average a fifth grader comes to our school at least two or three grade levels behind. >> reporter: these kinds of educational deficits have caused lingering problems for a city where one-third of all students fail to graduate on time. >> we have to make sure that we are... >> reporter: that has led to a concentrated effort by bridgeport academy middle school. like all our achievement first schools to place and keep great teachers in the classroom. in order to identify who those great teachers are, achievement first ceo says the organization has developed a comprehensive checklist to evaluate its teachers. >> in the past teacher evaluation has focused on observations which at their worst become staged dog and pony show experiences that don't actually tell you a lot about teachers' effectiveness or more importantly how they need to improve. >> i want us now to walk quickly through the school work for the whole observation. >> reporter: at this school teacher observations are detailed bi-weekly and discussed at length in regular
references to the trust deficit that has at times existed between this committee and the cia. if i'm confirmed, the address the deficit between the committee and the cia would be wholly unacceptable and i would make it my goal on day one of my tenure and every day thereafter to strengthen the trust between us. i have a reputation for speaking my mind, and at times doing so in a direct manner, which some attribute to my new jersey routes. -- roots. i would like to think that my candor would reassure you that you'll get straight answers from me, maybe not always those you will like, but you will get answers and they will reflect my honest views. that is the commitment i made to you. i would like to finish by saying a few words about the importance of taking care of the women and men who serve in the cia. because the of the secretiveness that the intelligence work requires, few americans will ever know the making sacrifices that these professionals and their families make every day. many have risked their lives and at times have given their lives to keep our country states. -- safe. i
. it is important for us, whether we are talking about this issue or our deficit issue, to understand the demographic changes that are happening in and around the country. it is also the case -- i know you have been talking about manufacturing. we have a lot of jobs in this country that are unfilled. as a former superintendent of schools, i can tell you that my first priority is that we have to fill those jobs here. we are doing a horrendous job of preparing people for the stem fields that are required to make sure this country actually leads the world in advanced manufacturing. there is so much more we can do. we have not begun to do what we need to do for kids in this country to be ready for the 21st century. while we do that, it seems to me that it makes no sense for us to be saying to people that have acquired advanced degrees here and our foreign nationals, whose education we subsidized, but for a answer, because of obsolete caps that do not make sense, if that that ought to go build a business to compete with people in the united states. we need those folks here, to be able to d
on cutting the federal deficit? >> you're definitely seeing a split. in the house of representatives, you see a lot of republicans who see the sequester as maybe their only opportunity to get spending cuts, and on the senate side, you definitely see some of those were traditional republicans like senator john mccain, snorkeenator kelly ayotte of ne hampshire where we can't make the defense cuts clear. there's a divide, and it's unclear exactly how they're going to bridge the gap there. >> dana, this divide, how dangerous is it for an entire party that's really trying to reinvent itself after the november loss. >> it is a pretty serious one. you see a lot of the green eye shades republicans here in washington aren't listening to the governors. the more popular officials and their party saying, look, it's important to rein in spending. that can't be the sole label for this party. when you have so many washington republicans saying the budget cut is even more important than national defense, there seems to be -- i think we're finally reaching a level where there is some push-back. and so there i
additional revenue coupled with smart spending reductions in order to bring down our deficit. and we can do it in a gradual way so it doesn't have a huge impact. >> the republican leadership saying flatly, no more tax hikes. >> so they're all dug in again on the fiscal issues. if you look at the polls, wolf, the public wants the president and congress to tackle those fiscal issues. ironically, they may be closer on gun control. they may be closer on immigration reform. but it's still the fiscal issues that are the real problem. >> in the next few week, they have some major things coming up on those issues. dan pfeiffer, the president's senior adviser, will join us in the next hour to discuss guns, guns and guns. >>> the nation's new secretary of state's wasting no time getting down to business. john kerry spent a busy weekend on the phone with palestinian and israeli leader, plus officials in japan, south korea and turkey. all that was before he officially said hello to the state department staff today. >> here's the big question before the country and the world and the state department aft
and deficit debate is harmful to the business environment now? >> the uncertainty is back. the amount of -- the uncertainty is bad. you go from the fiscal cliff to the deficit debate to sequestration. that is inherently disruptive to business investment. certainty is a good multiplier. we are these long cycle businesses that have global competition. i do not have the lecture he to say that i will quit investing for six months until this is reserved. -- resolved. i will keep going. the people who can hurt the worst by all of this are the small and medium businesses. the people that have no buffer. that get confused. these are the people that are the heart of the u.s. economy. they are the ones that are constantly being bombarded as we go from one to another. this can only be solved here. this is one of the few cases where the business roundtable of people speak with one voice. it would be great to get a resolution. >> there is a divide in the corporate side on the corporate tax front. large companies would benefit more from corporate tax reform, especially going to a territorial system
in order to bring down our deficit. if you combine those things together we cannot only reduce our deficit but we can invest in education and research and development that will help us grow. martha: what do you think about that at home and what does karl rove think about that. former senior adviser to president george w. bush. there was a lot in that sound bite. we know the tax hikes have kicked in, but the president is suggesting that we need more money from the american people essentially. >> we have a spending problem not a revenue problem. revenues this year are anticipated to be above the year they were in fiscal '08. they are going to be over $2.9 trillion over $2 trillion. spending has increased more rapidly than revenues. the tax revenues we got as a result of raising the rates on the top two brackets was eaten up about it congress in one spending bill proposed about it administration, the sandy relief measure. we have a spending problem and it's going to get worse. martha: during the campaign we heard from governor romney about changing the structure of the tax code long term inst
're going to be serious about reducing our deficit, can we combine some smart spending cuts because there's still some waste in government. can we reform our health care programs in particular because we spend a lot more on health care than every other country does, and we don't get better outcomes. there's a lot of waste in the system. there are things we can do to reduce health care costs. and can we close some loopholes and deductions that folks who are well connected and have a lot of accountants and lawyers can take advantage of. they end up paying lower rates than a bus driver or a cop. can we close some of those loopholes? if you combine those things together, then we can not only reduce our deficit, but we can continue to invest in things like education and research and development that are going to help us grow. washington cannot continually operate under a cloud of crisis. that freezes up consumers. it gets businesses worried. we can't afford these self-inflicted wounds. there is a way for us to solve these budget problems in a responsible way through a
is if we can reduce the deficit, can we combine some spending cuts because there's still waste in government, can we reform our health care because we spend more than eany other country. there's ways to reduce health care costs. and can we close loopholes and deductions that folks that are well connected and have a lot of accountants and lawyers can take advantage of, can we close some of those loopholes. if you combine those things together, then we cannot only reduce our deficit but we can continue to invest in things like education and research and development that's going to help us grow. washington cannot continually operate under a cloud of crisis. that freezes up consumers, it gets businesses worried. we can't afford these self-inflicted wounds. and there's a way for us to resolve these budget problems in a responsible way through a balanced approach that the vast majority agrees with. there's no reason why we can't. we can't have washington dysfunction getting in the way. >> it's interesting to hear them say we do need additional revenue but it's not going to come from
. let's reform the defense budget and look at the largest drivers of our deficit in mandate spending programs those on the left end of the spectrum don't want to cut. >>brian: they took gates cuts and are going try to up them by $500 billion. leon panetta takes over from them. has the same fear. here's what he said yesterday on "meet the press." >> we've got a plan for that possibility because there are so many members saying we're going to let it take place, but i have to tell you it is irresponsible for it to happen. i mean, why -- why in god's name would members of congress elected by the american people take a step that would badly damage our national defense, but more importantly undermine the support for our men and women in uniform? why would you do that? >>brian: that is inaccurate. it is the president who proposed these sequester cuts. this isn't congress doing that. and republican fear about these cuts, would you say that's accurate? >> i would say it's accurate. there is a growing resignation to them on the hill for some reason. i was there two weeks ago. everyone seems re
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 94 (some duplicates have been removed)